Hijab – Are Campaigners Facing the Wrong Way?

Amid everything else that is going on in Iran at present, the country also lost its only female Olympic medallist. Kimia Alizadeh competed for her homeland in Taekwondo at the 2016 Rio Olympics where she won a bronze medal. In a statement she cited the fact that she was forced to wear a hijab as one of the reasons behind her decision to defect.

If you are familiar with the recent history of the hijab in the west that last sentence is bound to strike you as a little strange (at least if you follow the party line). From Linda Sarsour channelling her inner-Obama on Women’s March posters to Nike bringing out a ‘sports hijab’, the dominant narrative seems to be that the hijab is somehow a symbol of female liberation. Given that the most common Islamic explanation behind the need for the hijab is that it protects women through reining in male sexual desire, the defence of this garment, by those who would normally loudly denounce any focus on the effect of female clothing on men as ‘slut shaming’, is bewildering to say the least. Then again, logical consistency has never been a hallmark of wokeness.

Perhaps the strangest expression of the hijabi cheerleading that exploded in most western countries over the past decade or so is #WorldHijabDay. On the 1st of February women around the world are encouraged to don the hijab for a day. One of the stated aims of this day, which is enthusiastically promoted on college campuses, is to promote the right of women to wear the hijab. Given that this right is enshrined in all western countries already (admittedly some ban the full-face veil), and that many reports where hijabs were pulled from Muslim women have been shown to be hoaxes, one struggles to see why this issue needs to be highlighted.

I strongly suspect that the bigger issue surrounding the hijab around the world is the fact that women, and often very young girls, are forced to wear it. This has been highlighted to me on several flights out of the Middle East where ladies around me got rid of their headscarfs almost as soon as the flight was airborne. Alizadeh’s protest is but the tip of the iceberg. In fact, over recent months Iran’s prisons were filled with women who defied the regime by taking off what they regarded as a hateful symbol of their subjugation.

This brings us to some vital questions: Will those behind #WorldHijabDay issue a statement in support of Alizadeh’s right NOT to wear the hijab? Will Linda Sarsour denounce the mullahs in Iran for their oppression of women who simply want to feel the wind in their hair? In Iran an image of a young lady holding her hijab on a stick, to symbolise her utter rejection of it, went viral. Will western feminists track her down to make sure that she tells her story on every single talk show out there?

Somehow, I’m not holding my breath.


‘Nothing to do with Islam? – Investigating the West’s Most Dangerous Blind Spot’ Get your copy today!


‘War is Deceit’ – When Trust Makes Us Vulnerable

The ‘Prophet’ Muhammad famously said: “War is deceit”. Two incidents, barely a week apart, powerfully illustrated the fact that this is still seen as a cornerstone of jihadist strategic thinking.

In both cases a position of trust was used as a platform from which to unleash carnage in the name of Allah. A supposedly ‘model prisoner’ stabbed those responsible for his ‘rehabilitation’ to death on London Bridge (29 November 2019). A trainee pilot in Pensacola went on a rampage against those who were training him (6 December 2019). How could something like this happen?

Perhaps this story (found in Sahih Bukhari 52:271) from the life of Muhammad will shed some light: “The Prophet said, “Who is ready to kill Ka’b bin Ashraf (i.e. a Jew).” Muhammad bin Maslama replied, “Do you like me to kill him?” The Prophet replied in the affirmative. Muhammad bin Maslama said, “Then allow me to say what I like.” The Prophet replied, “I do (i.e. allow you).

Note carefully what happened here: One of Muhammad’s followers asks for permission to lie, and it is immediately granted to him. What happened next is described in Sahih Bukhari 53:369. Bin Maslama goes to the person marked for death by Muhammad and pretends that he is deeply disillusioned by the ‘prophet’. In this way, he gained the person’s trust and was admitted into his inner circle. After the ‘friendship’ was firmly established, Maslama asked Ka’b whether he could smell the perfume on his head, an act that could only take place between trusted friends. Trusting his ‘friend’, Ka’b allows this and is immediately grabbed and killed!

“War is deceit” indeed.


Much more, including several more examples (drawn from impeccable Islamic sources) of how deceit can be used as a weapon of war, can be found in my book ‘Nothing to do with Islam? – Investigating the West’s Most Dangerous Blind Spot’


Coming Very Soon! ‘The House Built on Sand’

Coming This Week: ‘The House Built on Sand’

A few weeks ago I sent you an email letting you know that my new book ‘The House Built on Sand’ would be released ‘soon’. Given how long it took to complete the final steps in getting it ready for the press, that may have been a tad optimistic!

Anyway, I’m finally able to say that the book will be released within the next week or so. In case you don’t know, ‘The House Built on Sand’ will be very different from my other books. Primarily because it is a work of fiction. It is, however, a novel with a serious message. Especially since it points readers to some of the same issues that I address in my book ‘The Mecca Mystery – Probing the Black Hole at the Heart of Muslim History

You may recall that I’ve been deeply impacted by the rampant censorship of non-politically correct voices on social media. As part of this my Twitter account of more than 100,000 followers was deleted without any warning. This significantly limited my reach in terms of reaching potential readers. I would, therefore, really appreciate your help to get the word out once ‘The House Built on Sand’ is released. You can do this in the following ways:

  • Get your own copy – better still get a few as Christmas presents (it will be available in both Kindle and paperback versions)
  • Forward the launch announcement (when it comes) to your friends
  • Post the link www.thehousebuiltonsand.com on your Facebook or Twitter feed
  • Post a review on the Amazon website once you have read the book.

I look forward to sharing ‘The House Built on Sand’ with you and I trust that you will agree with me that it is a great read (with a great purpose – i.e. getting people to think about the place of Islam in the modern world). I’ll let you know as soon as it is ready.


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The Knives are Out! (And Have Been for Long Time)

One weekend, two knife attacks in major European cities – London and The Hague. Obviously this is no coincidence. I suspect, however, that few people will realize what deep historical roots such random stabbing frenzies have in Islam’s past.

The Kharijites was a hugely influential early (7th century onwards) group of discontents within the ‘House of Islam’ who were convinced that the Muslim community was straying from the purity that existed during the time of Muhammad. They firmly believed that what the world really needed was a state wherein, as their catch-cry incessantly repeated, there would be ‘No judgement but Allah’s!

And how exactly was this lofty goal to be achieved? Here is how a historian of the movement, Muhamad bin Ahmad al-Malati, described their modus operandi: “…they would ‘go out with their swords into the markets while people would stand around not realising what was happening; they would shout “no judgement except God!” and plunge their blades into whomever they could reach, and go on killing until they themselves were killed’. Sound familiar?

ISIS, which can in many ways be seen as the modern-day descendants of the Kharijites, was not slow to learn the lesson. Here is, for example, an exhortation from the April 2016 issue of their online magazine, Dabiq: “One must either make the journey to dar-al-Islam, joining the ranks of the mujahidin or wage jihad by himself with the resources available to him (knives, guns, explosives etc.) to kill the crusaders and other disbelievers and apostates…

Over the next few days we will probably be ‘treated’ to multiple theories to try and explain the sudden surge in random knife attacks. Some of these will, no doubt, work very hard to get Islam off the hook by blaming alienation, psychological stress or western foreign policy. As you read these, remember that there is indeed nothing new under the sun! We are faced with an ancient ideology, that uses tried and tested methods. We must get to grips with this fact and target all our attention to defeating its truth-claims if we want the knives to go back in their sheaths.


For more on the role of the key texts of Islam in motivating violence see my book ‘Nothing to do with Islam – Investigating the West’s Most Dangerous Blind Spot


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